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As hurricane Florence approaches, follow these tips to keep your family safe

Hurricane Florence is expected to make landfall on the East Coast by Friday morning. While you prepare to evacuate or shelter in place, here are some helpful safety tips from your temporary housing source. 

      

If you are advised or ordered to evacuate

·         Follow all directions and orders from local officials and leave immediately when instructed to do so.

·         Bring emergency supplies, including: a first aid kit, medicine, food, water, formula and diapers, toiletries, cell phones, radios, and batteries.

·         Take extra cash and copies of important papers such as insurance policies.

·         Pack blankets, sleeping bags, books, and games.

·         Unplug appliances, turn off utilities such as electricity and the main water valve.

·         Lock the windows and doors of your home.

·         Don't forget about your pets! Pack their food, beds, a toy and any meds. 

 

If you are not told to evacuate

·         STAY AT HOME! Leave the roads available for those who must evacuate. If you absolutely must leave your home, NEVER drive through floodwaters. Turn around, don't drown.

·         Clean your bathtub with bleach and fill it with water for washing and flushing (not drinking).

·         Set your refrigerator to maximum cold and keep it closed.

·         Turn off your utilities if told to do so by local officials.

 

During the storm

·         Go to an interior room and stay away from windows and doors, even though they're covered.

·         During very strong winds, lie under something sturdy.

·         Do not go outside, including during passage of the eye of the hurricane.

 

 

CRS is tracking and preparing for Hurricane Florence. Our Catastrophe team is ready to assist both insurance adjusters and policyholders with immediate emergency hotel and housing assistance.

  • We are fully staffed 24/7/365 for immediate assistance.
  • Timely deployment of CRS employees on-site to support adjusters and policyholders.
  • Priority booking with major hotel chains for needs of adjusters and policyholders.
  • Competitive pricing on homes, condos, townhomes, apartments, mobile homes and travel trailers.
  • Capability to provide temporary office trailers for carriers.
  • One point of contact for adjusters and policyholders to minimize confusion.
  • Internal weather tracking so we know where the storm is heading.  
 

800-968-0848    |    request@crsth.com    |   www.crsth.com

 
 

Source(s):

https://weather.com/safety/hurricane/news/hurricanes-safety-during-20120330

https://www.crsth.com/services/catastrophe/

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It’s hurricane and wildfire season, is damage to my home covered?

Running over the entire summer from June 1st to November 30th, hurricane season brings serious damage risks from high winds, rain, and flooding in storm-prone regions. Is your biggest asset well protected? Your home is most likely your family’s most valuable investment. Know that your current homeowner’s insurance policy may cover some damage brought on by a hurricane, but not all.

Running concurrently with hurricane season, wildfire season is a period when wildland fires are likely to occur, spread, and affect resource values sufficient to warrant organized fire management activities. Higher temperatures, reduced snowpack, increased drought risk, and longer warm seasons are increasing wildfire activity in the western United States.

Make sure you have the proper coverage

Review your homeowner’s insurance policy today to make sure your policy is up-to-date and you are properly protected for anything that may happen. Here are a few tips regarding damage brought on by hurricanes and wildfires.

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WIND

In most states, standard homeowner’s policies cover damage caused by wind, including hurricanes. But if you live in a high-risk coastal state you might need to buy separate windstorm insurance. Check with your insurance company as it might also be available as a rider on your current policy. Windstorm insurance covers damage from any high wind, not just hurricanes. The cost of a separate windstorm policy depends on the amount of your deductible, where you live, and how much it would cost to rebuild your house.

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FLOOD

Flood damage brought on by, or as the result of, a hurricane is not typically covered in a private homeowners insurance policy. U.S. law requires people to purchase basic flood insurance if their home is in a designated high-risk flood area with a federally backed mortgage. (See floodsmart.gov for more information.) But in 2017, Hurricane Harvey showed that flooding can also damage properties outside the highest-risk zones and affect homeowners who weren’t required to buy the additional coverage.

Check with the National Flood Insurance Program as you may be able to purchase a separate flood insurance to help cover such damage in your area.

Don’t procrastinate

Flood insurance policies impose a 30-day waiting period between the time you buy and the time coverage takes effect, so review your policy today. If a major storm has been forecast, there’s a chance that your current coverage will be locked in until that major weather event has passed.

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WILDFIRE

Damage from wildfires and forest fires is most likely covered by your homeowner’s insurance, but coverage may vary by geographic location and by policy. You may also find that some insurers do not sell homeowner’s policies in areas where wildfires are common, or it may be offered by paying a higher premium. Check your policy or contact your agent to learn about terms and coverage limits.

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The Insurance Information Institute (III) recommends reviewing the amount of coverage you have in place and make any necessary adjustments to help ensure your limits are in line with the potential cost of repairing or rebuilding your home.

Whether you’re buying homeowners insurance, flood insurance, windstorm insurance or wildfire insurance — or all four — make sure you have enough coverage to pay for the full cost of rebuilding your house. Your insurance agent can help you pinpoint the right amount.

 

Sources:

https://www.floodsmart.gov

https://www.wsj.com/articles/what-homeowners-insurance-wont-cover-if-a-hurricane-hits-1504897428

https://www.iii.org/article/hurricanes-harvey-and-irma-insurance-faqs

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Keep you and your family safe by preparing for the 2018 tornado season

As the northeast gets hit by yet another winter storm in March, we’re starting to see increased tornado activity in the southeast this spring. A tornado can strike without warning in any season but are prone to happen most often in the spring and summer months. Occurring at all hours of the day and night, data shows that they tend to occur between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. Time to prepare!

In the United States, about 1,200 tornadoes strike each year and every state is at risk. These devastating storms can bring severe hail, heavy rain, flash flooding and lightning. The majority of tornadoes in the U.S. occur east of the Rocky Mountains with concentrations in the central and southern plains, the Gulf Coast and Florida.

If you live in an area prone to these deadly storms, three of the most important things you can do to prepare you and your family are:    1 - Build an Emergency Kit

   2 - Make a Family Communications Plan

   3 - Review your Homeowners Insurance

Build an Emergency Kit

Most of the items that will go in your kit are inexpensive and easy to find, and any one of them could save your life. Also make sure to consider what unique needs your family might have, such as supplies and medications for pets and seniors. For just a few dollars and minutes of your time, you’ll have a kit comprised of food, water, and other supplies to last for at least 72 hours.

Visit www.ready.gov/build-a-kit for more information and to download a printable grocery list.

Make a Family Communications Plan

Do you have a plan in place in the event of a tornado? If not, make one today! Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so having a family communications plan will allow you to know how to best contact one another and reconnect if separated. Make sure to establish a family meeting place that’s familiar and easy to find.

Visit www.ready.gov/make-a-plan for more details on how to best draw up your family communications plan.

Review your Homeowners Insurance

Don’t wait until the next tornado watch to decide to review your homeowners insurance for storm coverage. Whether your insurance helps cover tornado damage to your home depends on where you live, the type and amount of coverage you have and what caused the damage.

One of the biggest risks you may face if your home suffers major damage during a severe storm or tornado is being underinsured. Contact your agent to discuss your policy and if necessary have them verify that the current insured value is up to par. While you’re at it, make sure to have your insurance agent’s number and email saved to your mobile phone.

Additionally, find out what your limit is for Additional Living Expenses (ALE) and how you can expect the coverage to work. ALE covers the increased cost of living due to a displacement, including any extra rent you will have to pay for your temporary home. CRS Temporary Housing works closely with your agent to quickly find the best temporary accommodations for you and your family. With 24-7-365 service, we are committed to help you and provide the absolute best customer service.

 

SOURCES:

https://www.ready.gov/tornadoes https://www.allstate.com/tools-and-resources/home-insurance/insurance-for-tornado-damage.aspx https://www.thebalance.com/home-and-car-insurance-for-tornado-damage-4026154

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Safety tips for during and after a blizzard.

Winter storms can pack a devastating punch bringing not only snow and ice, but by dangerously low temperatures, severe wind gusts, and flooding. These blasting storms can also cause power outages that last for days. They can make roads and walkways extremely dangerous or impassable and close or limit critical community services such as public transportation, child care, health programs, and schools. Injuries and deaths may occur from exposure, dangerous road conditions, and carbon monoxide poisoning and other conditions. We want you to take extra care of yourself and your family during this time. Below are a few safety tips on what to do during and after a major winter storm.

During Blizzards and Extreme Cold

  • Stay indoors during the storm.
  • Drive only if it is absolutely necessary. If you must drive: travel in the day; don’t travel alone; keep others informed of your schedule and your route; stay on main roads and avoid back road shortcuts.
  • Walk carefully on snowy, icy, walkways.
  • Avoid overexertion when shoveling snow. Overexertion can bring on a heart attack—a major cause of death in the winter. Use caution, take breaks, push the snow instead of lifting it when possible, and lift lighter loads.
  • Keep dry. Change wet clothing frequently to prevent a loss of body heat. Wet clothing loses all of its insulating value and transmits heat rapidly.
  • If you must go outside, wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing rather than one layer of heavy clothing. The outer garments should be tightly woven and water repellent.
  • Wear mittens, which are warmer than gloves.
  • Wear a hat and cover your mouth with a scarf to reduce heat loss.

After Blizzards and Extreme Cold

  • If your home loses power or heat for more than a few hours or if you do not have adequate supplies to stay warm in your home overnight, you may want to go to a designated public shelter if you can get there safely. Text SHELTER + your ZIP CODE to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the nearest shelter in your area (e.g., SHELTER20472)
  • Bring any personal items that you would need to spend the night (such as toiletries, medicines). Take precautions when traveling to the shelter. Dress warmly in layers, wear boots, mittens, and a hat.
  • Continue to protect yourself from frostbite and hypothermia by wearing warm, loose-fitting, lightweight clothing in several layers. Stay indoors, if possible.

Cold-related Illness

  • Frostbite is a serious condition that’s caused by exposure to extremely cold temperatures.
    • a white or grayish-yellow skin area
    • skin that feels unusually firm or waxy
    • numbness
    • If you detect symptoms of frostbite, seek medical care.
  • Hypothermia, or abnormally low body temperature, is a dangerous condition that can occur when a person is exposed to extremely cold temperatures.  Hypothermia is caused by prolonged exposures to very cold temperatures. When exposed to cold temperatures, your body begins to lose heat faster than it’s produced. Lengthy exposures will eventually use up your body’s stored energy, which leads to lower body temperature.
    • Warnings signs of hypothermia:
    • Adults: shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech drowsiness
    • Infants:  bright red, cold skin, very low energy. If you notice any of these signs, take the person’s temperature. If it is below 95° F, the situation is an emergency—get medical attention immediately.

Carbon Monoxide

Caution: Each year, an average of 430 Americans die from unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning, and there are more than 20,000 visits to the emergency room with more than 4,000 hospitalizations. Carbon monoxide-related deaths are highest during colder months. These deaths are likely due to increased use of gas-powered furnaces and alternative heating, cooking, and power sources used inappropriately indoors during power outages.
  • Never use a generator, grill, camp stove or other gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal¬ burning devices inside a home, garage, basement, crawlspace or any partially enclosed area. Locate unit away from doors, windows, and vents that could allow carbon monoxide to come indoors. Keep these devices at least 20 feet from doors, windows, and vents.
  • The primary hazards to avoid when using alternate sources for electricity, heating or cooking are carbon monoxide poisoning, electric shock, and fire.
  • Install carbon monoxide alarms in central locations on every level of your home and outside sleeping areas to provide early warning of accumulating carbon monoxide.
  • If the carbon monoxide alarm sounds move quickly to a fresh air location outdoors or by an open window or door.
  • Call for help from the fresh air location and remain there until emergency personnel arrives to assist you.
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Important wildfire relocation information.

Important wildfire relocation   Experiencing a wildfire can be devastating. Not to mention having to evacuate and not knowing how the wildfire will impact your home, and life for that matter. In our world, we often see and hear of this alongside the first responders and those on the frontlines. While the initial concern is the safety of all involved, secondly, the need to get families temporarily relocated becomes of utmost and dire importance.   Emergency relocation can be a stressful and chaotic scenario. A family needs an immediate place to live while busy claims professionals are tasked to do so quickly. They may often rely on temporary relocation providers to handle and source housing options, especially during a catastrophic event and when there are many policyholders and families to look out for.   Options for temporary relocation after a wildfire can include immediate emergency hotel stays, short and/or long-term housing, commercial property or a fully equipped travel trailer on or near the affected property. The latter can ease the burden of being far away from home and can allow for the homeowner(s) to oversee any construction.   In the event where a large area has been affected, experienced temporary housing companies can deliver these emergency relocation solutions during high-demand times when options may otherwise seem limited. Among other expectations, a relocation provider can use an extensive database of like, kind and quality options no matter the lifestyle; a single homeowner, couple, entire family or business owner.   Providers should also offer a one-stop shop. This will free up the insurance adjuster to focus on handling the claim portion and focus more so on the claim itself. A few options to look for in a temporary housing company:  
  • A knowledgeable service team on hand with 24-hour availability.
  • A point of contact for each stage of the relocation.
  • Access to multiple inventories in different markets.
  • Full coordination of move in, move out and management of services.
  • Flexible billing options and invoicing for claims professionals who may handle multiple accounts.
  • Creative relocation solutions. Does the family need to continue to care for livestock? Are there medical needs? Is there a need for a more high-end solution or a solution for a business owner?
  • Longevity of a provider. A company that has many years in the industry has likely assisted in many catastrophes, large or small.
  There are numerous ways to handle a relocation. While no two are alike, outstanding customer service and provider knowledge should remain consistent.   For immediate assistance and to obtain housing from wildfire damage or loss, provide CRS with your insurance information and claim number (if one has been given to you) and let us handle the rest.  

If you do not have insurance and need housing and rental assistance information:

  Find a disaster recovery center near you - You can text DRC and a zip code to 43362 (4FEMA) to locate a Disaster Recovery Center in your area. https://egateway.fema.gov/ESF6/DRCLocator     Contact your state emergency management agency - https://www.fema.gov/emergency-management-agencies     Locate FEMA participating hotels - femaevachotels.com    
Please reach out for more information or if we can answer any of your questions. We are here to help.
Our thoughts are with you, please stay safe!
 

Adjusters please visit the CRS portal, Call us at 800-968-0848 or email a request to request@crsth.com to submit a housing request on behalf of your policholder.

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Preparing for Hurricane Matthew

Hurricane Matthew is expected to make landfall in Florida soon. While you prepare to evacuate or shelter in place, here are some helpful safety tips from The Weather Channel:

 

If you are advised or ordered to evacuate

·         Follow all directions and orders from local officials, and leave immediately when instructed to do so.

·         Bring emergency supplies, including a first aid kit, medicines, food, water, formula and diapers, toiletries, cell phones, radios, and batteries.

·         Bring extra cash and copies of important papers such as insurance policies.

·         Bring blankets, sleeping bags, books, and games.

·         Unplug appliances, turn off utilities such as electricity and the main water valve.

·         Lock the windows and doors of your home.

 

If you are not told to evacuate

·         Stay at home! Leave the roads available for those who must evacuate.

·         Clean your bathtub with bleach and fill it with water for washing and flushing (not drinking).

·         Set your refrigerator to maximum cold and keep it closed.

·         Turn off your utilities if told to do so by local officials.

 

During the storm

·         Go to an interior room and stay away from windows and doors, even though they're covered.

·         During very strong winds, lie under something sturdy.

·         Do not go outside, including during passage of the eye of the hurricane.

 

  

CRS is tracking and preparing for Hurricane Matthew. Our Catastrophe team is ready to assist both insurance adjusters and policyholders with immediate emergency hotel and housing assistance.

  • We are fully staffed 24/7/365 for immediate assistance.
  • Timely deployment of CRS employees on-site to support adjusters and policyholders.
  • Priority booking with major hotel chains for needs of adjusters and policyholders.
  • Competitive pricing on homes, condos, townhomes, apartments, mobile homes and travel trailers.
  • Capability to provide temporary office trailers for carriers.
  • One point of contact for adjusters and policyholders to minimize confusion.
  • Internal weather tracking so we know where the storm is heading.

 

Some insurance companies are also deploying catastrophe response teams to assist with claim reports in their mobile units and call centers. Among those currently preparing include Allstate, CNA Insurance and GEICO.

 

Current Red Cross Shelter information: https://www.google.org/crisismap/florida_emergency_preparedness

  

Source(s):

 

https://weather.com/safety/hurricane/news/hurricanes-safety-during-20120330

 

http://www.claimsjournal.com/news/southeast/2016/10/06/273989.htm

 

https://www.crsth.com/services/catastrophe/

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