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Top 5 Causes of Electrical Fires

 

It's Electrical Safety Awareness Month! Here at CRS we are listing the Top 5 Causes of Electrical Home Fires. Hopefully, with this knowledge, you can take away some tips to help keep your own household safe and flame-free.

 

Download List

 

 

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How to Make A Tornado Safety Kit!

  It's Tornado Season - whether we like it or not! While we might not be able to change that fact, we can be prepared for it. Tornados are one of the most damaging weather events during the spring. The average number of touch-down tornados in the country are 187 in April and 275 in May. From us here at CRS, here's a quick how-to video showing our version of an easy and affordable Tornado Safety Kit you can make for your household.  

Download Kit

   
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Tricks-4-Safe-Treating

Leaves are falling, temperatures are dropping, and pumpkin-flavored everything is popping up everywhere – Ladies and Gentlemen, Fall is finally here. Along with this long-awaited beginning of the coziest season yet comes one of the most popular holidays around – Halloween! Here are some helpful tips and advice to ensure both fun and safety during your trick-or-treating adventures for kids, teens, and adults alike.


Before you get started…
  • Keep costumes both creative and safe.
  • Decorate costumes and bags with reflective tape or stickers.
  • Face paint and makeup are better than masks, which can obstruct a child’s vision.
  • Have children carry glow sticks or flashlights to help them see and be seen by drivers.
  • Make sure the costume is the right size to prevent trips and falls. If possible, choose a light-colored costume.
While you’re walking…
  • Only cross the street at corners with traffic signals or crosswalks.
  • Look left, right and left again before crossing and pay attention as you cross the street.
  • Put electronic devices down and keep heads up.
  • Walk, don’t run, across the street.
  • Teach children to make eye contact with drivers before crossing in front of them.
  • Always walk on sidewalks or paths. If there are no sidewalks, walk facing traffic as far to the left as possible.  (Children should walk on direct routes with the fewest street crossings.)
  • Watch for cars that are turning or backing up. Teach children to never dart out into the street or cross between parked cars.
While going door-to-door…
  • Check candy for choking hazards like gum and hard candies. Throw away any candy that is not sealed with a wrapper and avoid homemade treats received from strangers.
  • If you’re turning your home into a haunted house keep safety in mind. Make sure steps, sidewalks, porches, and paths are well-lit and free of decorations and holiday props.
  • Only approach houses with a partner and stick to porches that are well lit.
  • Be mindful of allergies when selecting which candy you’d like to eat or pass out.
While you’re driving…
  • Drive VERY slow. Be VERY alert. Children are excited on Halloween and may move in unpredictable ways.
  • Take extra time to look for kids at intersections, on medians, and curbs.
  • Enter and exit driveways and alleys slowly and carefully.
  • Eliminate as many internal distractions as possible to concentrate on the road and your surroundings.
  • Anticipate heavy pedestrian traffic and turn your headlights on earlier in the day to spot children from greater distances.
If you have a teenager…
  • Review the importance of obeying the law. Sit down with your child and discuss private property, town curfews, and alcohol regulations.
  • Remind them of your house rules and be upfront that police are patrolling and looking for misbehaving teens.
  • If they are going to a party, speak to the parents of the host to ensure it will be chaperoned.
  • Review driving safety. Remind your teen that both young children and intoxicated drivers will be on the roads that evening.
  • If your kids are going to a party, tell them to keep an eye on their drink. Once they have put it down, they should not drink it again.
  • Clearly discuss with your teen where they can and cannot go.
  • Track their whereabouts with apps like Snapchat or Find my iPhone.
  • Limit the number of friends in a car. Be proactive and remove distractions for your teen driver and limit the number of kids allowed to ride.
Always remember…
Popular trick-or-treating hours are 5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. so be especially alert for young children during those hours. Also, kids under the age of 12 should NOT be alone at night without adult supervision. If kids are mature enough to be out without supervision, they should stick to familiar areas that are well lit and/or trick-or-treat in groups.
Most importantly...
HAVE FUN! Enjoy the day in your own safe and responsible way. Connect with family and friends alike and make this Halloween one to pleasantly remember!
Articles used for reference and material:
https://www.safekids.org/tip/halloween-safety-tips
https://www.teensafe.com/blog/13-tips-keeping-teens-safe-halloween/
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/halloween-safety-10-tips_b_12561956
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Start your summer right with Memorial Day safety

As we happily head into this Memorial Day weekend, let’s take a moment to be thankful for our troops, and honor the passing of the members of the military who died in active duty.    Memorial Day weekend is here, and with it comes outdoor fun in the sun. Whether you’re road-tripping or celebrating at home, be aware and take a few safety precautions to ensure a happy and safe holiday weekend. No matter which way you slice the numbers, according to AAA this long holiday weekend is poised to be one of the busiest on record.  

Travel

- Make sure your car is ready for the trip. Pack a first-aid kit, bottled water and some energy bars in case you get stranded. Bring a car adapter for charging your cellphone. - Schedule your road trip at times to help avoid the holiday travel congestion. Leaving before rush hour Friday or early Saturday and driving back Monday before 3 p.m. or after 10 p.m. should make for less traffic hassles. - Never leave people or pets inside a parked car. Temperatures inside a vehicle can climb to dangerous levels quickly, even on a cloudy day. - If you plan on drinking alcohol, designate a driver who won’t drink.  

Being outside

With the temperatures rising, it’s important to know how to stay safe during times of excessive heat. - Eat small meals and eat more often. - Stay hydrated, avoid caffeine and alcohol. - Wear loose-fitting, lightweight and light-colored clothing. - Take frequent breaks if you are working outdoors, avoid strenuous outdoor activity.  

Grilling

Seven out of every 10 adults in the United States have a grill or smoker, and this weekend marks the symbolic start to summer and grilling season. - Never leave your grill unattended, and have a fire extinguisher available. - Propane and charcoal BBQ grills are for outdoor use only. - The grill should be placed well away from the home, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches. - Keep children and pets away from the grill area. - Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill. Heavy food build-ups can cause nasty flare-ups.  

Water safety

BOATING - Have one life jacket that is US Coastal Guard approved for everyone on board. - If a child is under the age of 13, they must have a life jacket on whenever the boat is in motion. - The rules for driving a boat are similar to those of a vehicle - people cannot drink and drive a boat. SWIMMING - Everyone, including experienced swimmers, should swim with a buddy in areas protected by lifeguards. Always remember the penguin credo, never swim alone!  #skipper    - Adults, actively supervise children and stay within arm’s reach of young children and newer swimmers. - Understand what to do to help someone in trouble, without endangering yourself; know how and when to call 9-1-1; and know CPR.  

Always remember

Have a first aid kit nearby and emergency contacts programmed into your phone. You never know when an accident can happen, and better to be prepared just in case.  

SOURCES https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/how-to-avoid-grilling-mishaps-this-memorial-day-weekend/70005010 http://www.redcross.org/news/press-release/Red-Cross-Offers-Summer-Safety-Tips-for-All-Season-Long
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Preparing for Hurricane Matthew

Hurricane Matthew is expected to make landfall in Florida soon. While you prepare to evacuate or shelter in place, here are some helpful safety tips from The Weather Channel:

 

If you are advised or ordered to evacuate

·         Follow all directions and orders from local officials, and leave immediately when instructed to do so.

·         Bring emergency supplies, including a first aid kit, medicines, food, water, formula and diapers, toiletries, cell phones, radios, and batteries.

·         Bring extra cash and copies of important papers such as insurance policies.

·         Bring blankets, sleeping bags, books, and games.

·         Unplug appliances, turn off utilities such as electricity and the main water valve.

·         Lock the windows and doors of your home.

 

If you are not told to evacuate

·         Stay at home! Leave the roads available for those who must evacuate.

·         Clean your bathtub with bleach and fill it with water for washing and flushing (not drinking).

·         Set your refrigerator to maximum cold and keep it closed.

·         Turn off your utilities if told to do so by local officials.

 

During the storm

·         Go to an interior room and stay away from windows and doors, even though they're covered.

·         During very strong winds, lie under something sturdy.

·         Do not go outside, including during passage of the eye of the hurricane.

 

  

CRS is tracking and preparing for Hurricane Matthew. Our Catastrophe team is ready to assist both insurance adjusters and policyholders with immediate emergency hotel and housing assistance.

  • We are fully staffed 24/7/365 for immediate assistance.
  • Timely deployment of CRS employees on-site to support adjusters and policyholders.
  • Priority booking with major hotel chains for needs of adjusters and policyholders.
  • Competitive pricing on homes, condos, townhomes, apartments, mobile homes and travel trailers.
  • Capability to provide temporary office trailers for carriers.
  • One point of contact for adjusters and policyholders to minimize confusion.
  • Internal weather tracking so we know where the storm is heading.

 

Some insurance companies are also deploying catastrophe response teams to assist with claim reports in their mobile units and call centers. Among those currently preparing include Allstate, CNA Insurance and GEICO.

 

Current Red Cross Shelter information: https://www.google.org/crisismap/florida_emergency_preparedness

  

Source(s):

 

https://weather.com/safety/hurricane/news/hurricanes-safety-during-20120330

 

http://www.claimsjournal.com/news/southeast/2016/10/06/273989.htm

 

https://www.crsth.com/services/catastrophe/

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What if a flood happens in my community?

pexels-photo-29095

As we begin to approach the end of summer and continue to see the widespread flooding in Louisiana and growing fires in California, we ask ourselves, “what’s next, and will my community be affected?”.

It is important to know that we are still in the midst of hurricane season, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has recently increased their hurricane estimate from 10 to 16 named storms to 12 to 17. They are now expecting five to eight of those storms to become hurricanes.

Much of the US will feel the impact of these storms. Are you prepared? Does your family have a plan in place in case your home or community are flooded? Do you have flood insurance?

Even if you’re located in a part of the country not commonly impacted by hurricanes, sudden microbursts, severe thunderstorms and melting snow can also lead to flooding. Don’t hesitate to prepare in advance; the best time to put a flood plan in place is when it’s not flooding.

Here’s a few tips on what you can do now to be better prepared for flooding throughout the year:

- Know your flood risk. (www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart/pages/flooding_flood_risks/understanding_your_risk.jsp)

- Make a flood emergency plan. (www.ready.gov/make-a-plan)

- Build or restock your emergency preparedness kit, including a flashlight, batteries, cash, and first aid supplies. (www.ready.gov/kit)

- Consider buying flood insurance.

- Familiarize yourself with local emergency plans. Know where to go and how to get there should you need to get to higher ground, the highest level of a building, or to evacuate.

- Stay tuned to your phone alerts, TV, or radio for weather updates, emergency instructions, or evacuation orders.

How will I know when a potential flood is coming?

The last bullet point above advises us to stay informed by phone, TV and radio for weather updates. It’s necessary to understand the terminology you are hearing:

Flood Watch = “Be Aware.” Conditions are right for flooding to occur in your area.

Flood Warning = “Take Action!”  Flooding is either happening or will happen shortly.

Educating yourself and your family about potential flooding can be one of the most important things you do.

This graphic is called "3 Fast Flood Facts," and features tips on how to stay safe during flooding. The text reads as follows: 3 Fast Flood Facts Heavy rain can bring dangerous flash flooding. 6 inches of moving water can knock a person down. 2 feet of moving water can sweep a vehicle away. Whether you're walking or driving, stay clear of floodwater. Share these facts with friends so they're safe too.

Sources:

www.newyork.cbslocal.com/2016/08/17/hurricane-season-2016

www.ready.gov/floods

www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart/pages/preparation_recovery/before_a_flood.jsp

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